Foodservice Equipment & Supplies

JUL 2018

Foodservice Equipment & Supplies magazines is an industry resource connecting foodservice operators, equipment and supplies manufacturers and dealers, and facility design consultants.

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22 • FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES • JULY 2018 Juergen Friese, asssistant director of culinary services, University of Colorado Boulder No. of Students Served: CDS dining centers serve about 3.3 million meals per year. No. of Facilities: 17 Dining Services Employ- ees: 320 Annual Revenues: $50 million + Years in Current Position: 4; 29 years in campus dining services Education: European trained chef First Job in Campus Dining: Kitchen manager, Faculty and Staff Club Favorite On-Campus Dining Spot: The university's expansive salad bars, and the Persian venue at the Center for Community Best Part About Working in C&U Foodser- vice: "Our dynamic customer base." Rich Neumann, director of culinary services, Ohio University No. of Students Served: 8,357 students on meal plan, 3.7 million meals served annually No. of Facilities: 3 all- you-care-to-eat dining halls, 3 markets, 5 cafes, 1 retail food court with 7 concepts, 1 casual- dining restaurant, Bird Arena concessions, full-service catering, 4 regional cafes Dining Services Employees: 180 hourly, 10 full-time administrative assistants, 52 full-time management employees Annual Revenues: $47.4 million Years in Current Position: 13 Education: Master of Science — Nutrition/ Food Science, University of Wisconsin- Stevens Point First Job in Campus Dining: Student employ- ee at University of Wisconsin -Stevens Point; Favorite On-Campus Dining Spot: Desti- nations at The District Best Part About Working in C&U Foodser- vice: "The opportunity to educate students and prepare them for any career. Skills learned in Culinary Services are transferable to any job." Kent Scott, associate director of auxiliaries operations, Ohio University Years in Current Position: 4 Education: Hospitality Management, University of Akron First Job in Campus Dining: Assistant manager Favorite On-Campus Dining Spot: Latitude 39° Best Part About Working in C&U Food- service: "Making our customers happy by providing them with quality products and excellent services." C. Dennis Pierce, executive director of dining services, University of Connecticut No. of Students Served: 12,052 on meal plan, 5.4 mil- lion meals served annually No. of Facilities: 8 dining halls, 1 training facility, 5 cafes, 1 food truck, 9 retail outlets Dining Services Employees: 450 full-time equivalents, 1,200 students Annual Revenues: $71.5 million Years in Current Position: 10, with UConn 30 years Education: MBA from UConn First Job in Campus Dining: Manager at University of Hartford Best Part About Working in C&U Foodser- vice: "Creativity and the ability to respond on a dime, whether it's the president's office asking you to do something, or a student with an idea or an emergency happening on campus. Also, the demographics on campus: Students keep pushing us for positive change." Kirk Rodriguez, managing director of hospitality services, Texas Tech University No. of Students Served: Campus popula- tion, 38,000; 8,200 on-campus residents; 4.9 million transactions annually No. of Facilities: 24 loca- tions with 51 concepts, 2 residential dining facilities Dining Services Employees: 900 Annual Revenues: $40 million Years in Current Position: 3, previously 25 years at Texas Tech Education: Degree in Hospitality Manage- ment from Texas Tech First Job in Campus Dining: Student cook Best Part About Working in C&U Foodser- vice: "The energy, diversity and expecta- tions of the students we serve. It's exciting to be providing them options and it's not just about the food. We're interacting with and helping to shape young adults." COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY ROUNDTABLE PARTICIPANTS bicycle-powered blenders. It's a novelty, but tour groups love it. And a very exciting new addition is our 3,000-square-foot greenhouse. Positioned right off and visible from the Village Center's salad bar, it features approximately 140 aeroponic grow- ing towers and produces a variety of lettuces and greens for the salad bar and other venues. Greens are harvested, washed and put directly into the walk- in cooler. It's the lowest possible carbon footprint and customers love the flavor, the varieties and the sustainability. Next, we're looking to grow our own wheatgrass for our fresh juice bar. Scott: What's 'in' for us is more restaurant-style operations, customiz- able food options and more cooking with flair in front of customers. We're reducing some of our kitchen sizes: All three of our residential dining halls have been renovated with more space being given to front of house. We're DIRECT DIRECTORS from the

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