Foodservice Equipment & Supplies

APR 2018

Foodservice Equipment & Supplies magazines is an industry resource connecting foodservice operators, equipment and supplies manufacturers and dealers, and facility design consultants.

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60 • FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES • APRIL 2018 functional by design of development and design at Myers Restaurant Supply in Santa Rosa, Calif. A classically trained chef who earned high accolades on New York's fine din- ing scene before moving to California, Scheiman joined Myers five years ago as part of a career shift and now leads the company's design team. He begins designing each cookline by talking shop with the chef or owner. "I talk with them about their food, where and how they've been trained, about the types of ingredients they'll be using and how they plan to produce their hot items," Scheiman says. "Take sauces. Some chefs like to finish plates with sauces that are already prepared and kept hot on the line. Others like to make their sauces a la minute. In that case, they need all of the components required to bring sauces together at the last minute within reach. It's important to design the space for that into the line." Leif Billings, regional director, Northeast, for Chicago-based Next Step Design, agrees restaurant cookline projects need to start with the chef's vi- sion and style. While a standard rule of thumb says the kitchen should account for roughly 33 percent of an operation's footprint, a similar standard does not exist for cookline-specific space alloca- tion, he notes. "It really depends on the chef and the menu," Billings says. "Typically, you're starting with some kind of a wish list of equipment from the chef. So we can say, OK we have this much space for the cookline, what can we fit within that? Then it's a careful balance of meeting with the chef and/or the operations team to make sure we're able to fit in what they need to produce the menu in the most efficient, cost- effective ways possible." Individual chef preferences aside, the majority of cooklines have a lot in common. Where space allows, the typical battery includes some combina- tion of grill or charbroiler, plancha or griddle, standard or convection oven, Firepoint Grill's main cookline flows from fryers at one end to a double convection oven at the other, with spreaders used between each key station. Specialty wood-fired equipment pieces, including a grill, rotis- serie and pizza oven, bookend the main cookline. Photo courtesy of Next Step Design "Then it's a careful balance of meeting with the chef and/or the operations team to make sure we're able to fit in what they need to produce the menu in the most efficient, cost-effective ways possible." — Leif Billings, Next Step Design

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