Foodservice Equipment & Supplies

AUG 2019

Foodservice Equipment & Supplies magazines is an industry resource connecting foodservice operators, equipment and supplies manufacturers and dealers, and facility design consultants.

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42 FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES AUGUST 2019 No.3 nie Sure, trendy options like food trucks, wine bars, and specialty coffee kiosks and food halls have proven appeal in the broader marketplace, but they're also headed to senior living communi- ties. As dynamics and demographics continue to change, creative efforts to make senior living less isolated and more multigenerational are ramping up. Operators are thinking outside the box to adapt market-driven services and experiences to this segment. A marquee example: The dining team at Fleet Landing, a continuing care retirement community near Jacksonville, Fla., rolled out its own branded food truck, The Anchor. Conceived and designed by executive chef Chris Gotschall as way to provide an alternate venue during the remodel of an older cafe, the truck is thought to be the €rst operated by a senior living community. On most days, The Anchor is parked with full plumbing and electri- cal hook-ups just outside the old cafe location. The dining team also takes the truck to different locations within Fleet Landing as well as off campus to special events in the Jacksonville area. There, it serves as a great marketing tool, one that helps to break down preconceived notions of senior dining as stodgy, notes Bob Kinney, Fleet Landing's director of food and beverage. "A lot of communities are now starting to bring in food trucks run by local operators for special events and grand openings, but we built and oper- ate our own," Kinney says. "It's been a huge hit. Residents love it. When their families visit it's one of the €rst things that they want to show off, especially to their grandkids. The staff loves it too. It's fresh and novel, and everyone's having fun with it." Out€tted with a full kitchen, including charbroiler, Šattop grill, reach-in refrigerator and freezer, fryer, hood, roll-top prep table, and three- compartment sink, the truck's signature offerings include a lobster grilled cheese sandwich, grilled shrimp tacos and lettuce wraps. In its €rst two weeks of operation, during an unusually hot spell in early summer, it was averaging more than $1,000 a day in sales at lunch alone. Kinney says daily specials are being added to the core menu, and breakfast may be added in the future as well. At Garden Spot Village, one move in particular ensures an open Šow of mul- tigenerational experiences. All of its €ve restaurants serve not just residents but staff and the general public as well. It's a major differentiator and helps residents to feel not just part of the Garden Spot community but a vibrant part of the broader community. "Family was always welcome to dine here, of course, but when we went to this new format and created the branded restaurants, we decided to open them up to the public," Kinney says. "It was the right decision. We now get a lot of people from the local community who frequent our restau- rants, especially at The Harvest Table. Residents are very proud of it, and they feel more integrated into the commu- nity. What's more, we're repeatedly told by locals that it's the best restaurant in eastern Lancaster County." Senior Dining Association's Ader sees that move — opening to the public — as a trend that will likely gain steam in the industry, noting that new develop- ments and facility remodels increasingly are being designed to facilitate public access to dining venues. No.4 kle e Serving fresh, cooked-to-order foods in the front of the house, of course, means senior living dining programs are upping their game in the back of the house as well. For staf€ng, recruiting efforts increasingly focus on attracting employees with experience in hospitality versus healthcare. As the industry continues to evolve, the chef-centric approach is gaining traction. Oakmont Senior Living, which operates Fountaingrove Lodge, Fleet Landing's new food truck, The Anchor, is a huge hit with residents, family and sta, alike. Photo courtesy of Fleet Landing 5 TRENDS IN eni ivin FOODSERVICE

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