Foodservice Equipment & Supplies

FEB 2019

Foodservice Equipment & Supplies magazines is an industry resource connecting foodservice operators, equipment and supplies manufacturers and dealers, and facility design consultants.

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FEBRUARY 2019 • FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES • 95 R 301 Ultra Food processor : Cutter and Veg Prep machine A reliable partner in today's kitchen ! 23 discs and 3 knives available Book a free demonstration in your kitchen on www.robotcoupeusa.com Robot-Coupe USA., Inc., 800/824-1646 taco, and fried clams can become a quesadilla ingredient. This approach, says Krebs, allows the chain to turn a single item into 25 different guest experiences — some more creative than others. With so much customization taking place in a Rutter's kitchen, the expo station becomes the center of the operation. The team member at this spot, usually a manager during peak hours, ensures that each dish matches the customer's order and meets Rutter's quality expectations. The expo station sits at the center of the production line, with the expo worker facing customers. Food flows to the expo station from the left, the right and behind, where a second line of cooking and storage equipment sits. From the expo staffer's point of view, a refrigerated make table sits to the immedi- ate left. This table has increased in size in recent builds, says Krebs, to enable staff to meet customer demand. In one of its newest superstores, in Duncannon, Pa., the table measures 72 inches. Here, staff assemble every sandwich and sandwich-esque offer- ing, including subs, wraps, burgers and tacos. These tables have see-through lids, notes Grandstaff, allowing customers to see the quality of the meat and produce. Next to the make table comes a pass-thru heated grab-and go unit, where guests can snag prepared burgers, hot sandwiches and other items without having to wait. To the immediate right of the expo station sits the wok station, where staff prepare Asian stir-fries, breakfast bowls and other items — and where guests get a bit of theater, adds Krebs. The wok station actu- ally has three distinct pieces: The woks themselves are the in the middle of the station. These units rely on induction heating and have a built-in hood system. To the right of the woks, immediately next to the expo station, is a hot table holding proteins, rice and noodles. To the left of the woks is a cold table, which holds wok-bound veggies. Notably, this cold table also holds items destined for the roller grill, the last piece of equipment on the line. While most convenience stores offer roller grill items as a self-serve component, at Rutter's, the grill sits behind the bio shield, allowing staffers to assemble orders. These orders are usually easy to put together, though, leading to the grill's placement at the far end of the line. "It's the easiest to prepare, and it takes the least amount of time to make. You have a little extra time to take a couple of extra steps, so we decided to put the roller grill farthest away," Krebs says. Touch-screen kiosks handle all foodservice orders at Rutter's. The fully open kitchen encourages guests to watch their orders being made.

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