Foodservice Equipment & Supplies

AUG 2018

Foodservice Equipment & Supplies magazines is an industry resource connecting foodservice operators, equipment and supplies manufacturers and dealers, and facility design consultants.

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44 • FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES • AUGUST 2018 functional by design it easy and efficient for employees to bring products out of the cooler, load them onto a cooking station and wheel them back into the cooler without mak- ing multiple trips. Design and Prep for Safety Courtney Barton, a former Hyatt Hotels chef and current corporate chef at Chicago-based specialty distribu- tor Testa Produce, notes that handling produce properly and safely hinges on a combination of a well-equipped station, diligent training and careful operations. She stresses the importance of refrig- eration, segregation and sanitation and suggests looking to the hotel kitchen model for guidance. Hotel kitchens typically physically segregate the garde manger, or cold prep station, from protein prep sta- tions to avoid cross-contamination and transfer of potential allergens. Cold prep also sits near the cooler and away from heat sources in the kitchen to help preserve product quality. Barton adds that prep staff training in every foodservice kitchen should follow strict handling procedures to ensure produce safety and quality. That starts with taking only a case or two of product out of refrigeration at a time, prepping that, refrigerating it and then bringing more out. And employees should have easy access to the right tools, which also should be segregated from those used in other stations. FE&S R R R H R FT H H H BC R R H K K R R FT SOUP & SALAD 1013 703 SF PRODUCE COOLER 1021 631 SF MAIN KITCHEN 1049 3088 SF 1-52 1-67 1-75 1-82 1-83 1-81 1-86 1-86 1-86 1-96 1-130 1-133 1- 1-03 1-85 1-163 1-184 1-184 1-187 1-184 1-02 1-192 1-193 1-214 1-217 1-221 1-222 1-215 1-215 1-216 1-216 1-216 1-216 1-216 1-216 1-232 1-216 1-216 1-197 1-34 1-195 1-144 1-167 1-196 1-194 1-155 1-154 1-153 1-152 1-156 1-151 1-02 1-74 1-143 1-142 1-225 1-83 1-83 1-83 3-01 3-02 3-13 3-12 3-21 3-16 3-17 3-22 3-24 3-26 3-12 3-31 3-04 3-05 3-03 3-25 3-07 3-16 3-35 1-187 1-01 1-01 1-209 1-96 1-191 1-76 1-80 1-01 1-01 3-32 3-27 3-33 3-14 3-11 3-06 1-147 1-172 1-111 1-127 1-145 1-171 1-02 ELECTRICAL 1-01 1-216 GENERAL FREEZER 1023 289 SF 1- 1-164 1-161 1-128 1-132 3-08 8-27 1-03 1-01 1-76 1-76 1-76 1-01 1-01 1-01 3-30 1-77 1-84 1-84 1-227 3-34 3-23 3-15 3-28 1-162 PROTEINS COOLER 1025 274 SF 8-26 8-23 8-25 8-31 8-24 8-22 8-21 1-228 1-131 1-138 1-210 1-231 1-226 1-223 1-224 SAFETY FIRST: STORAGE AND PREP TIPS ● Store raw, whole produce and raw, cut vegetables packed in ice as they are. Containers must be self- draining, and ice should be changed regularly. ● Don't wash most bulk produce before storing it as moisture promotes mold growth. ● Store cut melons, cut tomatoes and cut leafy greens at 41 degrees F or lower. ● Avoid cross-contamination by storing produce away from and/or above raw meat, poultry and seafood. ● Wash produce thoroughly under running water before prepping. The water should be slightly warmer than the temperature of the produce. ● When soaking or storing produce in standing water or ice baths, don't mix different items or multiple batches of the same item. ● Make sure fruits and vegetables don't come in contact with surfaces exposed to raw meat, poultry and seafood. Prep produce away from designated prep areas for these items. ● Clean and sanitize surfaces, sinks, utensils and equipment that staff will use to prep produce. This in- cludes knives and cutting boards. Source: National Restaurant Association/ServSafe Refrigerated produce access doors Bulk produce receiving Processing access Produce prep Produce prep Produce powerwash Produce processing equipment and worktables In a recent new-build project for a large noncommercial foodservice operation, consultants added a produce prep room adjacent to a designated produce cooler. The room is cooled through the HVAC system to roughly 50 degrees F to help maintain produce quality and safety during processing. Image courtesy of Webb Foodservice Design

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