Foodservice Equipment & Supplies

FEB 2018

Foodservice Equipment & Supplies magazines is an industry resource connecting foodservice operators, equipment and supplies manufacturers and dealers, and facility design consultants.

Issue link: http://fesmag.epubxp.com/i/932687

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 86 of 92

84 • FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES • FEBRUARY 2018 WASTE MANAGEMENT SERIES Henroid also tries to buy more bulk containers to cut down on packaging waste. For example, he has switched from buying individually packaged condiments to offering things like salad dressings, soy sauce, hot sauce, ketchup and mus- tard in large pumps at the salad bar and other self-serve stations. In some cases, going back to the waste hauler can help. In UC- SF's case, Henroid found out the operation's waste hauler had begun to accept specific food containers in its recycling stream, so there has been more focus on switching to products in that type of packag- ing. "Waste sorting stations have evolved over time, so some things that once could only go to the landfill are now becoming recy- clable and compostable," Henroid says. No. 4: Find the Low-Hanging Fruit Going trayless and cutting out the all-you-care-to-eat setup was an easy first step in cutting down on UCSF's food waste. Henroid admits one might chuckle to hear this, but straws represent his latest conquest. With three campuses and multiple foodservice and patient feeding out- lets, he estimates UCSF wastes about 700,000 straws a year. That's a lot of plastic. Since some compostable straws don't hold up well to heat, UCSF sticks with the classic plastic straws. In- stead of changing the product, Henroid's straw-waste-reduction effort follows a basic operational route. He trains the staff to carry straws around with them and to offer patients straws only when requested or required for medical needs. No. 5: Think Outside the Box More chefs now focus on turning scraps and other post- consumer compost into real food in a modern-day trash-cooking method made famous by the likes of Blue Hill chef Dan Barber and others. In UCSF's case, having a large catering program offers opportunities for students living on campus, among others, to take extra meals and food off its hands. "Colleges and uni- versities are seeing documented incidents of food-insecure students," says Henroid. "We have a very strong food safety program, so we are able to of- fer extra prepared foods to our students within a 30-minute window." By maintaining strict protocol for time and tem- perature control, UCSF can offer these extra meals to students because they still fall within the four-hour food-safety period. The hospital even developed an app students can use to see what food is available, where and when. It's a win-win for both sides; cash- strapped students get free meals, and the university can cut down that much more on what it sends to waste or compost. When closing in on the four-hour window, staff blast- chill any leftovers and a local food recovery bank picks them up for food-insecure San Francisco residents. As always, follow-up can prove to be an eye-opener, Henroid points out. "We were donating a ton of oatmeal to three outlets, and when I visited them I found out that they didn't really want any of it," he says. "You also have to be mindful of where the donated food is going." Community-wide infrastructure issues such as a lack of composting, little funding or limited waste hauling services might make it more of a challenge to tackle all the above steps toward a zero-waste goal. But, aiming for just one of these steps can help operators begin the process of building their own infrastructure for better waste management, within their four walls or campus borders. FE&S Henroid's straw-waste-reduction effort follows a basic operational route. He trains the staff to carry straws around with them and to offer patients straws only when requested or required for medical needs.

Articles in this issue

Archives of this issue

view archives of Foodservice Equipment & Supplies - FEB 2018