Foodservice Equipment & Supplies

FEB 2018

Foodservice Equipment & Supplies magazines is an industry resource connecting foodservice operators, equipment and supplies manufacturers and dealers, and facility design consultants.

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FEBRUARY 2018 • FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES • 83 InSinkErator.com/foodservice InSinkErator® disposers help keep food waste out of dumpsters and reduce waste-hauling costs, increasing kitchen efficiency and profitability. Bottom line? You save money. Want to save even more? Add an AquaSaver® control system and reduce your water usage by up to 70% compared to conventional disposer systems. AquaSaver's on-demand smart control senses grind loads, automatically delivering only the water necessary for efficient use — saving hundreds of gallons of water each year. AquaSaver includes a 3-year on-site parts and labor warranty.* * Standard warranty is 1-year from date of installation. New AquaSaver control system installations that include a new disposer and new AS-101 control center are eligible for a 3-year warranty on the entire system, including disposer. ©2018 InSinkErator InSinkErator is a business unit of Emerson Electric Co. D i s p o s e r s InSinkErator Manages water as efficiently as food waste. Henroid's team makes sorting, tracking and behind- the-scenes composting and recycling part of everyone's job. While many noncommercial operators have gone trayless, one UCSF Health facility continues to use trays. The reason? So that customers can bring their trays to the staff, who then sort the trash for them. Additionally, training the dish crew to rinse out contain- ers before putting them in recycling bins has just become part of UCSF's standard operating procedure. "Most of this is second-nature for everyone, but we will have the conversa- tion if we see this isn't happening properly," Henroid says. Beyond these steps, it's all about "boots-on-the-ground education," Henroid says. That means communicating waste reduction goals with key stakeholders and conducting mini sessions with the housekeeping, patient care and foodservice teams on what is recyclable versus compostable. No. 3: Focus on Packaging Recently, Henroid's team discovered most of the compostable disposables offered at the salad bar were ending up in the recycling bins, rather than in the compost bins where they belong. The reason, they determined, was the packaging: The containers looked like plastic, so consumers thought they should recycle them. "We're working with our packag- ing manufacturer now to apply embossing or a more visual indicator on the packaging that it is certified compostable," Henroid says. Sure, not all operators possess the purchasing power and scale to manifest those changes, but selecting packaging with clear symbols for recycling versus composting can help consumers make the right decision on the correct bin to toss containers. Operators can, however, take other steps to tackle this issue; namely, work with food and equipment suppliers to take back and recycle the cardboard and other containers used to ship the product. Beyond these steps, it's all about "boots-on- the-ground education," Henroid says. That means communicating waste reduction goals with key stakeholders and conduct- ing mini sessions with the housekeeping, patient care and foodservice teams on what is recyclable versus compostable.

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