Foodservice Equipment & Supplies

SEP 2017

Foodservice Equipment & Supplies magazines is an industry resource connecting foodservice operators, equipment and supplies manufacturers and dealers, and facility design consultants.

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We Keep You Cooking! From planned renovations to unplanned emergencies, interim facilities from Kitchens To Go keep you cooking. Our team equips your team with mobile and modular solutions to keep foodservice operations running. With us, you have a kitchen for every meal. See us in action at www.KitchensToGo.com/Video or call for a complimentary consultation (630) 355-1660. KEEP Cooking www.KitchensToGo.com and Alexandria, Va., proves to be the chain's most dramatic change to date. "We've had three design versions since launching, but this one was the most signifi- cant in terms of rebranding both the interior and exterior physical plan," Harron says. "We think it's really sharp and that it works for where we need to take the brand." Boston-based designer Peter Niemitz led the proto- type redesign project, which introduces a new exhibition kitchen with a stone-hearth oven, a new color palette and an open floorplan with a large centralized bar. Design elements include dark-stained oak and decora- tive tile floors in the bar area, walnut wall coverings, a granite bar top, glazed brick columns and plush carpeting in the dining area. Deep browns and blues are accented by lighter shades of taupe. In the bar area, seating ranges from lounge style to high-top communal tables, while the dining room features classic upholstered chairs and booths. Lighting drops down from high, fully exposed ceilings. Typical Burtons units run 6,200 square feet with seating for 200 inside, plus roughly 1,000 square feet of patio space seating another 40 to 50 guests outside. Most locations are either freestanding buildings or shopping-center endcaps. Kitchen and back-of- the-house areas comprise roughly one-third of total space, and include the pan- try, fry and saute stations and a stone-hearth oven. "We wanted to get some of the visual energy and the great aromas from the kitchen into the dining room," Harron says of the new open-kitchen design. "The end goal was to make our restaurants very sensual and to provide a high level of transparency and engage- ment. Staying competitive isn't simply about serving good food and having good service anymore; you have to also provide an element of entertainment and fodder for social media sharing. That's all part of our formula." CUSTOMERS WITH A PREFER- ENCE FOR A PAR- TICULAR SIZE OR CUT OF STEAK ARE ENCOUR- AGED TO CALL IN THEIR REQUEST AHEAD OF THEIR VISIT TO RESERVE A CUSTOMIZED STEAK.

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